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The common myth that sex becomes disinteresting to seniors has been debunked and proven to be false. A new poll has revealed that nearly two-thirds of adults aged between sixty-five to eighty say that they are interested in sex, while over fifty percent has proclaimed that sex is an important element to improve their quality of life. According to a study by the National Poll on Healthy Aging, forty percent of them are sexually active.

In another study, seventy-three percent of the total 1, 002 nationally representative seniors said that they are satisfied with their current sex life. This study was conducted by the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. This poll analyzed how seniors may seek for help or professional advice regarding sexual problems they might have encountered.

The results indicated that eighteen percent of the senior males and three percent among the senior females have taken medications and/or supplements to aid their sexual performance in the last two years. But, it is quite alarming that only seventeen percent have made consultations with their doctor. When asked why most of them suggested that clinicians should take a more proactive conversation with their senior patients.

Thankfully, there is senior living technology that can answer this problem. As it is typically uncomfortable to discuss sexual incompetence personally, an app may be utilized to call the health professional instead. In this manner, seniors will be able to discuss their sentiments without being impeded by shame.

Moreover, these senior apps that are particularly tailored for senior citizens offer a real-time presentation and exchange of information. In this manner, seniors can read up on their conditions and have access to information that will help them better understand that sexual incompetence is not a thing to be scared of.

“Sexual health among older adults doesn’t get much attention but is linked closely to the quality of life, health, and well-being. It’s important for older adults and the clinicians who care for them to talk about these issues and about how age-related changes in physical health, relationships, lifestyles and responsibilities such as caregiving, affect them,” said Erica Solway, Ph.D., co-associate director of the poll.

“This survey just confirms that the need for and interest in sexual intimacy doesn’t stop at a certain age,” says Alison Bryant, Ph.D., senior vice president of a research program. “Although most older adults say that they would talk with their doctor about sexual concerns, health care providers should routinely be asking all of their older patients about their sexual health and not assume that bringing up the issue will offend or embarrass them.”

The primary point that can be derived from this is that there is a necessity for medical professionals to initiate conversations regarding sexual health. It is quite unlikely for the patient themselves to open up about the topic, as there is a societal stigma that says failing to perform well sexually is embarrassing.